MYSTERIOUS GIANT HOLE WHAT THE HELL IS IT?

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A mysterious giant hole and crater have suddenly appeared in Siberia, Russia. There are not many details right now, but the video captured from a helicopter shows a weird configuration with debris and signs of combustion around it. Was it an explosion, an impact, or some violent drilling? What the hell is this?

The hole is about 262 feet (80 meters) in diameter and it certainly doesn’t look like a sinkhole, although you can see a large cavern under it.

The video was filmedfrom a helicopter over the Yamal Peninsula, the location of major gas fields discovered in 1972 and currently being exploited by the Russian energy giant Gazprom.

Mysterious giant hole suddenly appears in SiberiaExpand1

Of course, the internet is now raging with rumors about UFOs getting in or out of our planet’s crust. The reality may be less exciting than that. The Siberian Times reports:

Anna Kurchatova from Sub-Arctic Scientific Research Centre thinks the crater was formed by a water, salt and gas mixture igniting an underground explosion, the result of global warming. She postulates that gas accumulated in ice mixed with sand beneath the surface, and that this was mixed with salt – some 10,000 years ago this area was a sea.

That sounds like the most likely possibility indeed. At least more plausible than the alternative theories: Meteors, giant worm from hell coming out of its lair, and drilling UFOs.

According to the Russian paper, there’s an expedition on its way that “includes two experts from the Centre for the Study of the Arctic and one from Cryosphere Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. They plan to take samples of soil, air and water from the scene.”

Talking to The Sydney Morning Herald, polar scientist Dr. Chris Fogwill says it’s likely to be a geological phenomenon called a pingo—a block of ice that’s grown into a small hill in the frozen arctic ground:

The permafrost [frozen earth] can be hundreds of metres thick, allowing for large ice features.

This is obviously a very extreme version of that, and if there’s been any interaction with the gas in the area, that is a question that could only be answered by going there.

We’re seeing much more activity in permafrost areas than we’ve seen in the historical past. A lot of this relates to this high degree of warming around these high arctic areas which are experiencing some of the highest rates of warming on earth.

A giant, mysterious crater in northern Siberia is probably a melted ice formation rather than a hole from a meteor, says an Australian polar scientist.

The Siberian Times reported the giant hole in the Yamal Peninsula – which reportedly translates to “end of the world” – is up to 80 metres wide and has an unknown depth.

A team of Russian scientists have been dispatched to investigate the crater but University of New South Wales polar scientist Dr Chris Fogwill says it’s likely to be a geological phenomenon called a pingo.

An image of the crater taken by an engineer in a helicopter.An image of the crater taken by an engineer in a helicopter. Photo: Screen grab

“Certainly from the images I’ve seen it looks like a periglacial feature, perhaps a collapsed pingo,” Dr Fogwill said.

A pingo is a block of ice that’s grown into a small hill in the frozen arctic ground. The ice can eventually push through the earth and when it melts away it leaves an exposed crater. Dr Fogwill says the permafrost [frozen earth] can be hundreds of metres thick, allowing for large ice features.

“It’s just a remarkable land form.

Dr Chris Fogwill.Dr Chris Fogwill. Photo: Supplied

“This is obviously a very extreme version of that, and if there’s been any interaction with the gas in the area, that is a question that could only be answered by going there,” Dr Fogwill said.

The Siberian hole appeared about 30 kilometres from Yamal’s biggest gas field, Bovanenkovo, fuelling speculation there had been some sort of underground explosion.

That theory is supported by the fact the earth appears to have been push up from underground.

A Russian engineer reportedly filmed the hole from a helicopter and the vision has since been shared widely online.

Initial reports and comments labelled the video a fake.

But Dr Fogwill says pingos are a natural occurrence and can be so large they can been seen in satellite imagery in the arctic.

And global warming may mean more pingos in the future.

“We’re seeing much more activity in permafrost areas than we’ve seen in the historical past. A lot of this relates to this high degree of warming around these high arctic areas which are experiencing some of the highest rates of warming on earth,” Dr Fogwill said.

A team of Russian scientists was reported to be arriving at the site some time on Wednesday.